Besides being able to edit rhythm manually, there are some interesting tools to generate rhythm patterns using mathematical algorithms. The rhythm generators are available only in the phrase generator Rhythm menu.

The following rhythm generators are included:

  • Schillinger's Interference
  • Subdivision
  • Polyrhythm
  • Generic Rhythm
  • Probabilistic Rhythm
  • Euclidean Rhythm
  • Smooth Rhythm
  • Bass Rhythm
  • Simple Intervals
  • Toggle Intervals



Common Settings

There are 'Note Length' and 'Rests' settings that are common to all rhythm generators. You can see these controls under the rhythm generator UI, suggesting that these process the rhythm after rhythm generation. Please notice that note length is part of the rhythm in RapidComposer.

  • Note Length: options are Sustain Notes, Set Equal Length, Change By Percentage, Change By Offset
  • Rests: you can insert silence in the middle of a rhythm pattern

More detailed descriptions of the various rhythm generators are followed:




Schillinger's Interference

Schillinger’s Interference (based on Joseph Schillinger's work) places pulses on every Nth position creating an interference pattern. You can achieve a lot of nice results using this rhythm type. Experimentation is the key!

The settings above show the defaults for the Schillinger’s Interference Rhythm (using the Generic Generator). All of these parameters can be changed and tweaked to your liking. Let’s run through what each setting for Schillinger’s Interference means.

Schillinger’s Interference Settings

  • Duration: A pulse will be placed every Nth 'pulse width'. Set N with the Duration sliders.
  • Phase: You can offset the pattern. Valid phases are zero to Duration-1.
  • Pulse Width: Available settings are 1/4, 1/8, 1/16, 1/32, 1/64. The basic duration unit used by the generator. Set it to 1/16 to better see how it works.
  • 1 Pulse, 2 Pulses, 3 Pulses: Specify what happens when there are 1, 2, or 3 pulses at a given beat.



Subdivision

Subdivision works by recursive slicing of a long note. It is especially useful for creating percussion phrases but it can also create some very melodic and quirky patterns, which can be perfect for “chiptune” music. You can achieve a lot of great results in this style by increasing the Number of Subdivisions slider above the default of 6 (13 to 16 is a great number), and also increasing the Full Polyphony slider to above 50%. Subdivision is useful in a lot of other ways.

The settings above show the defaults for the Subdivision Rhythm (using the Generic Generator). All of these parameters can be changed and tweaked to your liking. Let’s run through what each Subdivision setting means.

Subdivision Settings

  • Subdivision: Available settings are Random Weighted (default), Random, or Successive. Depending on how these are set, different algorithms are used.
  • Number of Subdivisions: The number of slices, that is how many new notes are created. How “busy” the Phrase can be (or how “simple”).



Polyrhythm

Polyrhythm allows a phrase to include notes that are off-beat or uncommonly-placed. You can achieve a human-like performance quality using this rhythm generator type. You can set a duration (e.g. 2/4) which is then divided into 'division' parts.

The settings above show the defaults for Polyrhythm (using the Generic Generator). All of these parameters can be changed and tweaked to your liking. Let’s run through what each Polyrhythm setting means.

Polyrhythm Settings

  • Division1, Division2, Division3: Sets the number of divisions. E.g. if you set 5, the specified duration will be divided into 5 equal length parts
  • Beats To Divide: Sets the duration in quarter notes that you want to divide.



Generic Rhythm

Generic Rhythm (especially inside a Generic Generator) is one of the most useful ways to generate “piano-style” patterns. Don’t be fooled by the word “generic”, as it is anything but.

The settings above show the defaults for Generic Rhythm (using the Generic Generator). All of these parameters can be changed and tweaked to your liking. Let’s run through what each Generic Rhythm setting means.

Generic Rhythm Settings

  • Density: How “busy” the Phrase can be (or how “simple”)
  • Note Placement: Available settings are 1/4, 1/8, 1/16 or 1/32.
  • Musical Stress: Available settings are Strong, Strong-Middle, and Strong-Medium-Weak.



Probabilistic Rhythm

This generator will place notes based on probabilities. The bigger divisions have higher probabilities, e.g. 1/1 will more likely contain a note than 1/4 and 1/4 will more likely contain a note than 1/8, etc.

The settings above show the defaults for a Generic Generator. Notice how the default Rhythm is “Probabilistic”, interval at “Half Beat”, etc. All of these parameters can be changed and tweaked to your liking. Let’s run through what each setting for Probabilistic Rhythm means.

Probabilistic Rhythm Settings

  • Division: Available settings are 1/4, 1/8, 1/16, 2 Beats (2/4), 3 Beats, 4 Beats, 6 Beats, 8 Beats. Depending on how these are set, you’ll see the notes below change to be more “busy” or more “simple.”
  • Density: The number of notes to generate. How “busy” the Phrase can be (or how “simple”)
  • Randomness: Sets the movement or phrasing of the Phrase. Random can lead to some unexpected surprises, and Expected is the opposite.
  • Musical Stress: Accents to use in the rhythm pattern. Available settings are Strong, Strong+Middle, and Strong+Middle+Weak.



Euclidean Rhythm

The greatest common divisor of two numbers is used rhythmically giving the number of beats and silences, generating almost all of the most important World Music rhythms. The beats in the resulting rhythms are as equidistant as possible.

Euclidean Rhythm Settings

  • Steps: the length of the rhythm sequence in 'division' units
  • Density: it is the number of notes spread evenly in the number of steps
  • Offset: offset of the rhythm sequence
  • Mirror: possibility to mirror the sequence
  • Division: the note length used in the rhythm sequence



Smooth Rhythm

This generator creates a sequence where the neighboring note lengths are either the same, twice or half of the previous note.

Smooth Rhythm Settings

  • Shortest Note Length: the length of the shortest possible note in the sequence
  • Longest Note Length: the length of the longest possible note in the sequence
  • Allow 1:2:1 Division: option to allow/disallow a 1:2:1 division of a 4 unit long note



Bass Rhythm

Bass Rhythm places interesting rhythmic patterns one after the other. It suits monophonic sounds (obviously a bass guitar, and other instruments) best. If you play with the sliders a bit, you can achieve a lot of great dance/trance/techno-style piano patterns using this Rhythm type, with a Generic Generator.

The settings above show the defaults for Bass Rhythm (using the Generic Generator). All of these parameters can be changed and tweaked to your liking. Let’s run through what each Bass Rhythm setting means.

Bass Rhythm Settings

  • Patterns: Select the possible patterns that are inserted to each quarter note. Available settings are One Note On Beat, Two 16th Notes Before and After Beat, Two 8th Notes Before and After Beat, Two 16th Notes Before and a Note On Beat, and finally, Two 8th Notes Before and a Note On Beat. Depending on how these are set, you’ll see the notes below change to be more “busy” or more “simple.”
  • Note Length: Available settings are Short, Medium (default) and Long.



Simple Intervals

Simple Intervals are exactly that: simple rhythmic intervals. Sometimes you just need something simple and fast, that gets the harmonic job done, with a basic rhythm. NOTE: The Chord Generator uses the same type of simple rhythmic generation as Simple Intervals.

The settings above show the defaults for Simple Intervals (using the Generic Generator). All of these parameters can be changed and tweaked to your liking. Let’s run through what each Simple Intervals setting means.

Simple Interval Settings

  • Division: Available settings are Bar, 3/4, 2/4, 1/4, 1/8, 1/16, 1/32, 1/64, 1/4T, 1/4T Shuffle, 1/8T, 1/8T Shuffle, 1/16T, 1/16T Shuffle. Depending on how these are set, you’ll see the notes below change to be more “busy” or more “simple.”



Toggle Intervals

Toggle Intervals, like Simple Intervals, toggle when certain MIDI notes are played and when and where they are not. You can create very useful Phrases with Toggle Intervals, if you have a certain “groove” in mind.

The settings above show the defaults for Toggle Intervals (using the Generic Generator). All of these parameters can be changed and tweaked to your liking. Let’s run through what each Toggle Intervals setting means.

Toggle Interval Settings

  • Toggle Every: toggles every 1/1, 3/4, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/16, 1/32, 1/64 notes.